Beside Still Waters

Services

Sunday mornings at 9:00 AM & 11:00 AM

BEside Still Waters

“He leads me beside still waters.
  He restores my soul.
He leads me in paths of righteousness
    for his name's sake."

Our souls can often experience seasons of  troubled waters.  Throughout the scriptures we find many who are told not to fear or be anxious in their situations and circumstances familiar to us.  In this sermon series we will study such a moment in the life of Elijah and witness the immense love God has for his children who navigate  inner turmoil.  


RESOURCES TO CONSIDER

These books are selected for this sermon series to give you even more opportunities to learn about this important subject. As you consider the following resources, please note not every view, position or belief held by the authors are  endorsed by Church at Lake Mead or its staff.  


by J. P. Moreland

AVAILABLE IN THE CHURCH LOBBY

In May 2003 prominent philosopher, author, and professor J. P. Moreland awoke in the middle of the night to a severe panic attack. Though often anxious by temperament and upbringing, Moreland had never experienced such an incident before. Thus began an extended battle with debilitating anxiety and depression.

More than a decade later, Moreland continues to manage mental illness. Yet along the way he's moved from shame and despair to vulnerability and hope. In Finding Quiet Moreland comes alongside fellow sufferers with encouragement and practical, hard-won advice. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, nearly 20 percent of Americans suffer from mental illness, and people in the pews are not immune. Moreland explores the spiritual and physical aspects of mental illness, pointing readers toward sound sources of information, treatment, and recovery.


by Chris Hodges

AVAILABLE IN THE CHURCH LOBBY

Depression is the number one health issue in the world today, yet those who suffer are still sometimes stigmatized--especially followers of Jesus. Many assume God's peace, power, and protection should prevent us from ever feeling anxious, depressed, and afraid. But the Bible teaches otherwise, particularly in its depiction of the life of the Old Testament prophet Elijah.

In Out of the Cave, Chris Hodges uses Elijah's life to show us that everyone is susceptible to depression. Even when we're walking closely with God, we can still stumble and get lost in the wilderness of tangled emotions. But we don't have to stay there, because we serve a God who meets us in the darkness.


by Levi Lusko

I Declare War is a practical guide for fighting our inner war, the struggle against sin that breaks us down and fills our lives with pain and suffering, in turn making us feel weak and inadequate. With personal stories of his own struggles with night terrors, anxiety, narcissism, and self-doubt, Pastor Levi points readers to the hope and power that God offers in his Word.





by Tish Harrison Warren

Framed around a nighttime prayer of Compline, Tish Harrison Warren, author of Liturgy of the Ordinary, explores themes of human vulnerability, suffering, and God's seeming absence. When she navigated a time of doubt and loss, the prayer was grounding for her.  She writes that practices of prayer "gave words to my anxiety and grief and allowed me to reencounter the doctrines of the church not as tidy little antidotes for pain, but as a light in darkness, as good news."




by Timothy Keller

The question of why God would allow pain and suffering in the world has vexed believers and nonbelievers for millennia. Timothy Keller, whose books have sold millions of copies to both religious and secular readers, takes on this enduring issue and shows that there is meaning and reason behind our pain and suffering, making a forceful and ground-breaking case that this essential part of the human experience can be overcome only by understanding our relationship with God. 





by John Mark Comer

We are at war. Not with a foreign government or domestic terrorists or a creepy new artificial intelligence hell-bent on taking over the world. No, it’s a war we feel deep inside our own chests: we are at war with lies.

The problem isn’t so much that we tell lies but that we live them. We let them into our bodies, and they sabotage our peace. All around us in the culture and deep within our own body memories are lies: deceptive ideas that wreak havoc on our emotional health and spiritual well-being, and deceptive ideas about who God is, who we are, and what the good life truly is.

The choice is not whether to fight or not fight, but whether we win or surrender.


by Dr. Jean M. Twenge

With generational divides wider than ever, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand today’s rising generation of teens and young adults.

With the first members of iGen just graduating from college, we all need to understand them: friends and family need to look out for them; businesses must figure out how to recruit them and sell to them; colleges and universities must know how to educate and guide them. And members of iGen also need to understand themselves as they communicate with their elders and explain their views to their older peers. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation—and the world.